Vienna Recorders | AudioDeluxe

Electronic Delivery

PLEASE NOTE: This product is delivered via secure, electronic delivery. You will receive the full product license (with instructions) direct to your email. Enjoy a safe and fast way to get the latest version and full support direct from the manufacturer.

Free Shipping

At AudioDeluxe we provide Free Shipping on ALL items, big or small, within the Contiguous United States (otherwise known as the lower 48). No minimum purchase required, no special exclusions…when we say "Free" we mean it! When Free Shipping is chosen your product will ship via FedEx Ground, UPS Ground, FedEx SmartPost, or USPS Priority. Typical delivery estimate is between 3-10 days.

For additional options and international shipping, click here.

Vienna Recorders

Very popular during medieval times and into the renaissance, and even in the baroque era

$158.00

Tabs

Description

Compared with its close relative the flute (“flauto traverso”), the instrument range of the wooden recorder (“flauto dolce”) is more limited in terms of pitch and dynamics. This is one of the reasons why the recorder was replaced by the (traverse) flute in orchestras around the 18th century. However, recorders were very popular during medieval times and into the renaissance, and even in the baroque era famous composers such as Telemann, Bach, Händel and Vivaldi wrote pieces for these instruments.

 

Instruments:

  • Soprano recorder
  • Alto recorder 
  • Tenor recorder
  • Great bass recorder

Due to the absence of upper harmonics and a predominance of odd harmonics, the sound of recorders is soft and mellow. The instrument is often unfairly marginalized as a toy for children or amateur players, with its main application being music pedagogy and domestic music. However, contemporary composers of all genres (from Luciano Berio and Mauricio Kagel to Keith Jarrett) have written demanding pieces for the recorder, expanding its timbral range in a virtuosic way. What’s more, recorders are used as solo instruments in modern film music, adding a particular exotic timbre with references to ancient or far eastern worlds in orchestral scores. All four recorders of this Instrument Collection were played by Austrian flute and recorder virtuoso Leopold Eibl, a sought-after soloist and chamber musician.

 

Articulations:

 

Performances:

  • Interval Performances: Legato (with and without vibrato)
  • Repetition Performances in various lengths
  • Performance Trills

Single notes:

  • Short notes (staccato)
  • Long notes (sustains), with and without vibrato
  • Dynamics: Crescendo & diminuendo in various note lengths, sforzato (sfz)

You May Also Like

Big Savings This Month!